Behavior

You Only Have Ninety Days To Make An Impression.

I have a question for you. You just started a new job. You have been through what passes for the company orientation. You are comfortably situated in your cubical, and you have all the office supplies you need. The folks from IT will be down later in the day to set you up on your company laptop, company mobile phone, and they will even allow you to mirror some of the company applications on your own personal devices should you decide.

You have meetings set for the next several days, to meet with your team leader, supervisor, and the group manager. To say you’re excited would be an understatement. This is a big step for you. In all reality, it is really your first “real” job. All those other jobs, tending bar, working at the local hardware store, along with those few jobs you had that were shall we say, a tad bit dubious, are nothing compared to this one. This to you is where you start to make some real money. This job is why you went to college; this is the beginning of you starting a career.

So I ask this question of you, how much time do you think you have to make an impression? After all, from the way the cute HR Rep talked it seems like this is a place you can have a great future. Plenty of opportunities all you have to do is apply yourself and life will be great. But, again, I ask, how long do you believe you have to demonstrate you are someone that the company should make a long-term investment in?

Allow me to say both questions are rhetorical. Let me provide the correct response. You have ninety days, nine zero. Another way of looking at it is, you have three months to adapt, adjust, conform, and impress. Not a lot of time you say. You’re correct. But, it’s not impossible. However, let me be clear, fail and the outcome can affect you in ways you would never image.

Let me introduce you to two concepts, R.I.C.O., and P.E.O. The first RICO stands for Regular Access, Immediate Feedback, Consistent Measurement, and, One to One Relationship. The second PEO stands for Personal Economic Opportunity. They are connected. How they are connected will be discussed in a series of posts.

Before I continue with an explanation of RICO & PEO, It is important you understand you are working on an unofficial/official time limitation. You have approximately ninety days in which you need to:

a)gain a basic understanding of the roles and responsibilities of your job,

b)become rudimentary familiar with the company’s organizational structure,

c)build basic relationships,

d)develop basics of a plan that allows you to demonstrate your value to the company on a level that you are noticed by those who can enhance your career.

Simply put, during your first ninety days, you to have developed a plan by which you can demonstrate you can turn the value you’ve consumed into valued created. That you are someone who is an asset and not a liability.

I know, seems like a lot, especially for someone who is new, but, if you have plans for advancement with any company you work for, then you need to stop behaving like a recent college graduate. You need to start thinking and behaving like a seasoned veteran of the interoffice game of politics.

As cliché as this sounds your chances of having a successful and profitable career depends on what you do during your first ninety days on the job. Over the next several weeks I will be sharing some thoughts and insights on how you can develop a plan that will allow you to become a corporate star during that ninety-day time frame. Watch this space.

© Timothy A. Wilson 2016


You Get What You Demostrate

While watching the Sunday talking heads, I heard former New York Mayor Giuliani say the leader sets the culture of his organization. This was in response to the current situation that Gov. Christie is dealing with accusations of closing the GW Bridge as a form of political payback for not getting endorsements from the mayor of Fort Lee. He’s wrong in that area. This was bad behavior.

Leaders, set the tone and tenor of how they want their inner circle to behave they are the exemplars. Their subordinates take their cues from their leaders. If the leader is hard-driving and demanding on his direct reports, then they believe that’s how they should behave when dealing with their subordinates. If they have to anticipate what the leaders wants from them, then they want the same from others who work for them. Again keep in mind the leader is the exemplar and they in turn are exemplars and will pass on their behavioral traits, until they permeate the entire organization.

What happened in New Jersey was the direct result of what the governor wanted whether he gave a direct order to his staff or not. Gov. Christie was known for extracting retribution for the smallest of slights. This type of behavior is not uncommon among leaders who believe they are destined for bigger and better things. In their quest to exact payment for perceived slights they don’t think about the aftermath of what they do to exact retribution.

In the case of the four-day lane closing on the George Washington Bridge, millions of dollars lost in commerce because of the traffic delays, young school children late for their first day of school, emergency vehicles delayed, people late for work why, because the governor’s team believed he want to send a message to a mayor.

This wasn’t as mayor Giuliani said culture, this was behavior. Behavior that the leader – in this case the governor – encouraged and allowed because that’s reflective of his style. Fortunately, it’s correctable, but the question is as always, does he want to?

© Timothy A. Wilson All Rights Reserved


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